• Facebook logo
  • Twitter logo
  • Pinterest logo
  • Blog logo
  • LinkedIn logo
  • YouTube logo
  • Instagram
  • Google Plus logo

Fertilizer in Your Pond: Managing Nutrients to Change the Game

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Aug 01, 2018

01__Main Cover Image-668395-edited

Written by Industry Expert Matthew Ward, Fisheries Biologist

If you own or manage a body of water long enough, you will experience invasive vegetation and algae growth. This growth can be associated with bad smells and dead fish, converting an otherwise pristine waterbody into an ugly mess. Often, a manager’s first reaction is to identify the intruder, apply a fast-acting herbicide/algaecide and wash their hands of the matter. This strategy may work for a while, but unfortunately, growth returns time after time. Managers can eventually enter a cycle where the frequency and severity of invasive growth begins to climb out of control along with expenses. Enter Integrated Pest Management (IPM). IPM considers biological, mechanical and chemical controls alongside adjustments in cultural practices, enabling us to treat the problem, not just the symptoms.

Read More

Topics: Water Quality/Nutrient Remediation, Aquatic Weeds and Algae, Pond Management Best Practices

Stormwater Management Trends: Environmentally Friendly Pond Maintenance

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Jul 30, 2018

AS SEEN IN Quorum, Washington Metropolitan Chapter and Community Associations Institute: Written by Industry Expert Shannon Junior, Aquatic Ecologist

The_Greenlands_1_Summer_Scenic_AquaMaster_Fountain__York_County_VA__Kyle_Finerfrock__2013_cThe last decade has brought major changes to the pond and lake management industry. Every community that has privately maintained ponds, lakes or stormwater best management practices has responsibilities to manage the structural, functional and aesthetic integrity of the facilities. The primary ongoing maintenance issue in these facilities is typically the prevention and control of nuisance aquatic vegetation.

Read More

Topics: Water Quality/Nutrient Remediation, Published Articles

Use Water Quality Testing to Customize Your Lake Management Strategy

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Jun 11, 2018

Water Quality Monitoring

Written by Industry Expert Trent Nelson, Business Development Consultant & Aquatic Specialist

Everyone has heard the adage that no two snowflakes are the same, but did you know this truth also applies to your waterbody? No two lakes or ponds are the same—and location, size, water use, aquatic vegetation coverage and type, pond nutrient levels and water depth are all factors that can coincide in unique ways to influence the health of your waterbody. Oftentimes, odor and water color can reveal a lot, however, the unique characteristics of a lake or pond are not always this simple to observe. A professional lake manager tests water quality to capture and analyze the unique attributes that make up your waterbody and uses the data to create a totally customized lake or pond management plan. Many different parameters can be tested, but the basic values are pH, alkalinity, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, water temperature and nutrient levels. These parameters are of particular importance because they can help identify problem areas and significantly influence or help shape a management plan.

Read More

Topics: Water Quality/Nutrient Remediation, Pond Management Best Practices

Nutrient Management: Say No to Cyanobacteria if You Want Big Bass

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   May 29, 2018

HABs

AS SEEN IN Pond Boss MagazineWritten by Industry Experts David Beasley, Fisheries Biologist & Director of Fisheries and West M. Bishop, Ph.D., Algae Scientist & Water Quality Research Manager at SePRO Corporation

Several decades ago, pioneers of the trophy Largemouth Bass industry began connecting the dots on how to consistently grow big bass. Over the years, these innovators continually built on their knowledge to maximize production and develop fisheries from the bottom-up. They had a firm understanding that phytoplankton (microscopic algae throughout the water) was critical to producing those big bass we all daydream about, so they employed fertility programs that involved monitoring the plankton bloom and applying fertilizer when the bloom provided visual clues that additional nutrients were needed. Biologists developed an eye what to look for, and as result, fertilizing ponds became as much of an art as it was a science.

Read More

Topics: Water Quality/Nutrient Remediation, Fisheries Management

Solar Aeration System: Aerate Your Pond Without Electricity

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   May 07, 2018

Solar Aeration

Written by Industry Expert Hunter Poland, Environmental Scientist

It’s not hard to identify a stagnant lake or pond. Typically, a waterbody lacking proper water circulation is characterized by foul odors, cloudy or scummy water, nuisance aquatic weeds and algae, and, in many cases, a plethora of mosquitoes. Fortunately, it is possible to reverse the problems that can result from stagnant water by installing a lake or pond aeration system. Traditional electric aeration systems can be effective when a power source is available near the pond, but in many situations, electric service is unavailable. Or, you may simply be interested in a more ecologically-friendly aeration solution. If so, a solar pond aerator may be a great option to improve circulation in your waterbody.

Read More

Topics: Water Quality/Nutrient Remediation, Aeration

Hydro-raking: A Lakefront Management Tool

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Jun 26, 2017

 Written by Industry Expert Emily Walsh, Environmental Scientist 

Hydro-raking“Cowabunga!!” shouts Jimmy as he splashes in the crystal refreshing water and laughs to his friends to the side of the rope swing. “Come on in, lunch is ready!” yells mom as she smiles happily at the thought of the memories currently in the making.

Ten years later mom stares off into the distance where that rope swing used to sway to the beat of her children’s laughter. She now notices the empty space, along with the aquatic vegetation and accumulated organic matter that has been slowly creeping in year after year. She sits there for a few minutes, pondering how much life has changed – not only for her family, but for the aquatic ecosystem as well.

This moment, as it relates to our lakes and ponds, is one that is shared by many private shoreline residents. As time elapses, organic matter buildup can slowly increase from a variety of sources including leaf debris, woody sticks, inlet flows, and point sources such as culverts or non-point sources such as rainfall runoff. Input of organic matter slowly accumulates, leading to decreased water depth, altered hydrologic movement, hindered aquatic habitats, increased turbidity and impeded recreational value.

Read More

Topics: Water Quality/Nutrient Remediation, Pond Management Best Practices

The Importance of Monitoring Before Active Lake and Pond Management

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Jun 08, 2017

Written by Industry Expert Brea Arvidson, Aquatic Biologist

Parks and Rec Water Quality Testing SLM 3-e.jpgNatural or man-made, big or small, freshwater lakes and ponds are all aquatic ecosystems that serve an important role in our environment. So, they’re all the same? Water is water, right? Not quite. The individual characteristics, uses and management goals can vary drastically from waterbody to waterbody. That’s why actively monitoring and testing your lake or pond is so important.

How are waterbodies different?

Our waterbodies are an enigma; they are connected by rivers, streams and groundwater flow, but also function as their own interactive ecosystems. Differences in dimension, flow, nutrients, watershed, pre-existing organisms and plant growth all determine the variation of the lake or pond system. Exceptions to this are synthetically-lined ponds and stormwater ponds that are specifically constructed for flood management. These “closed systems” are typically disconnected from other waterbodies.

Not all waterbodies are formed or created equally, and most lakes and ponds quickly reach their biological and ecological threshold without proper management. Fish, plants, invertebrates and plankton may live within one waterbody, while another may not be capable of supporting the same amount of growth without becoming unbalanced. Furthermore, we use lakes and ponds for enjoyment – wildlife and scenic viewing, boating, swimming and fishing. High recreational activities and land development in and around lakes and ponds often lead to nutrient loading, nuisance aquatic plant growth and other water quality problems. When it comes to internal loading, sediment and biological decomposition are the two primary contributors.

Read More

Topics: Water Quality/Nutrient Remediation, Pond Management Best Practices

Sustainable Lake and Pond Solutions Through Nutrient Remediation

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   May 02, 2017

Written by Industry Expert Matt Salem, Permit Coordinator and GIS Specialist

Beneficial Buffer - Fountain - Community Pond (16) - e.jpgReducing excess nutrients in a waterbody has proven to be an effective means of managing harmful algal growth and shifting the remaining algae population towards more beneficial species. Nutrients enter lakes and ponds from a multitude of vectors including watershed inflow, stormwater runoff and accumulated bottom sediment. As management practices are refined and better strategies are developed, successful nutrient remediation projects are a paramount part of an integrated lake and pond management program, with the ultimate goal being to sustainably manage internal and external nutrient vectors.

The most effective nutrient management and remediation programs are ones that limit external and internal nutrient loading. Performing low-impact design on a watershed can provide relief from nutrient-rich water from entering a waterbody, but that strategy has limits to its effectiveness. Excess nutrients introduced into the waterbody can recycle and cause annual impairment, even after watershed management strategies have been implemented.

Read More

Topics: Water Quality/Nutrient Remediation

How Often Should Water Quality be Tested?

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Apr 13, 2017

Written by Industry Expert, Brea Arvidson, Aquatic Biologist

water-quality-aquatics-in-brief-e.jpgHealthy water quality is extremely important for all lakes and ponds, and proactive testing and monitoring is vital when it comes to helping prevent water quality problems in recreational lakes, stormwater ponds and drinking water reservoirs. Lake and pond owners often wait until an algae bloom, fish kill, foul odor or other negative water quality problem occurs before implementing a basic water quality program. This can have dire consequences.

Poor water quality can quickly lead to an unbalanced ecosystem, which not only negatively impacts the ecology and recreational use of a waterbody, but can also affect surrounding waterways. Take the enormous toxic algae bloom in Florida, for example, which originated in Lake Okeechobee in the summer of 2016 and impacted Treasure Coast waterways and beaches; the dangerous cyanobacteria limited boating, fishing and swimming throughout South Florida and posed a serious threat to the health of residents, tourists, pets and wildlife. While a number of unique factors contributed to the development and spread of this harmful algae bloom, it is clear that water quality problems in our lakes and ponds can rapidly turn into ecological nightmares.

Read More

Topics: Water Quality/Nutrient Remediation, Aquatics in Brief Newsletters

Sustainable Solutions for Lake and Pond Management

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Mar 28, 2017


AS SEEN IN Various Community Associations Institute Chapter Newsletters: Written by Industry Expert, Shannon Junior, Aquatic Ecologist and Senior Business Development Consultant

nutrient-remediation-sustainable-solutions-e.jpgAs lakes and ponds age, they are continually impacted by sedimentation and nutrient enrichment. Eventually, sediment and nutrient overload can lead to poor water quality and increased algae and nuisance aquatic vegetation blooms. It is extremely important to establish maintenance programs for community lakes and ponds which also function as stormwater management facilities. A key feature of these programs is the ongoing management of invasive vegetation and algal blooms.

The repetitive application of pesticides as the primary strategy for vegetation control is not environmentally sustainable, and the management focus is shifting toward non-chemical methods. In addition, due to tightened regulations and general public wariness regarding the use of algaecides and herbicides, it is becoming increasingly important to find alternatives for our nuisance aquatic vegetation treatment programs.

Read More

Topics: Water Quality/Nutrient Remediation, Published Articles

Use the search box to browse our blog
6 Key Reasons To Invest In A Professional Fisheries Management Company How To Restore Lake And Pond Water Quality Through Nutrient Management

Subscribe To Blog

Latest Blog Posts