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    The State of Applied Lake Management: An Expert's Perspective

    by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Aug 18, 2020

    Stormwater Pond_SOLitude Lake Management-1

    Written by industry expert Marc Bellaud, Director of Technical Services

    lakeline magazineAs seen in Lakeline Magazine, a publication of the North America Lake Management Society (NALMS). NALMS' mission is to forge partnerships among citizens, scientists, and professionals to foster the management and protection of lakes and reservoirs for today and tomorrow. Founded in Portland, Maine in 1980, this organization has grown into one of the largest societies in the lake and pond industry.

     

    Similar to what has occurred with technology, the science of applied lake management has evolved considerably over the past three decades. This evolution has occurred partly because of scientific advancements and partly out of need. Pressures from continued development, agricultural practices, climate change, greater recreational usage and increasing water demands are adversely impacting lakes at an accelerated rate. Fortunately, there is greater awareness of the challenges, and applied lake managers now have more tools at their disposal than ever before.

    Lake management needs and solutions vary considerably depending on the type of waterbody, its uses, geographic location and the particular challenges it is facing. Many of the old axioms remain true. First, every lake and pond is different. This needs to be taken into account as lake management plans are being developed. Assessment, monitoring and even permitting requirements must be appropriate for the size and type of waterbody, and for the management strategy being proposed. Second, prevention is the most effective form of management. No one can dispute the concept that preventing a highly invasive aquatic plant like hydrilla from being introduced to a lake is more preferable than trying to manage it once it’s established, or that eliminating nutrient sources in the watershed is better than trying to control harmful algal blooms (HABs) once they develop in a nutrient-rich system. However, the unfortunate reality is many of our lakes have already been adversely impacted, and in-lake management is often needed to preserve desirable conditions and to prevent further deterioration.

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    Topics: Water Quality/Nutrient Remediation, Aquatic Weeds and Algae, Invasive Species, Pond Management Best Practices, Aeration, Published Articles

    4 Proactive Lake and Pond Management Tips to Help Manage Midges

    by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Jul 07, 2020

    midge flies enews

    Written by: Sam Sardes, Weed Science Director, Certified Lake Professional

    Summer brings beautiful weather for most of the country, but with the joys of warmer temperatures, we should prepare for our six-legged, winged friends: midges. Midges are an important part of the aquatic food web as many fish rely on them as a primary food source. However, too much of a good thing leads to midges ruining our poolside sunbathing, cookouts and other outdoor activities which is why it’s important to proactively manage their arrival.

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    Topics: Pond Management Best Practices, Mosquito and Pest Control

    Nutrient Loading May be Fueling Toxic Algae in Your Community

    by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Jun 24, 2020

    toxic algae

    Written by industry expert Marc Bellaud, President

    Is it alarmist to refer to nutrient loading as a growing dilemma that is threatening our waterways? Not if you work in the lake and pond management industry or have a passion for preserving our aquatic resources. As an Aquatic Biologist who has managed water resources for more than 25 years, I firmly believe nutrient loading is a rising crisis that needs to be dealt with on a national and global scale.

    Almost daily, we see news headlines broadcasting dangerous cyanobacteria blooms, red tides, dead zones and algal toxins that degrade water quality, spur massive fish kills and threaten human health. These Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) are fueled by nutrients like nitrogen and phosphorus, which enter waterways through stormwater runoff that emerges from livestock facilities, agricultural farms, urban developments, and incidents of excess wastewater discharge.

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    Topics: Water Quality/Nutrient Remediation, Pond Management Best Practices

    Debunking Common Aquatic Herbicide Misconceptions: Glyphosate

    by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Jun 19, 2020

    aquatic-herbicide-treatment-glyphosate

    Written by industry expert Shannon Junior, Aquatic Ecologist and Senior Business Development Consultant

    One of the most common questions asked by clients is whether the products that we use to control aquatic weeds and algae in their waterbodies are “safe.” These concerns have become considerably more widespread in light of the recent controversies surrounding the herbicide glyphosate. Unfortunately, there is a lot of misinformation that is circulating, making it difficult to discern the difference between public outcry and peer-reviewed scientific data.

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    Topics: Aquatic Weeds and Algae, Invasive Species, Pond Management Best Practices

    6 Tips to Prevent the Spread of Invasive Species

    by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Jun 11, 2020

    invasive species

    With increased travel and recreation each summer comes the rise of invasive species. Invasive species are plants and wildlife that were introduced to an area that is outside of their natural range of dispersal. Though these invaders are not inherently bad, the general lack of natural competition or predators in our lakes, ponds and wetlands can lead to major outbreaks that dominate quickly and may be very hard to control. As a result, native species can suffer.

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    Topics: Aquatic Weeds and Algae, Invasive Species, Pond Management Best Practices

    Protect Essential Water Resources in Our Communities

    by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Mar 23, 2020

    In addition to serving as a space for peace and natural solitude in the face of coronavirus (COVID-19), our lakes, ponds and wetlands are an investment. One of the best ways to enjoy and protect these essential resources is by ensuring the progress you have made towards your freshwater goals is not reversed. Ongoing proactive management through the upcoming spring and summer months will prevent serious and costly problems from developing that could be detrimental to the health of the waterbody, as well as the surrounding community:

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    Topics: SOLitude News, Pond Management Best Practices, Seasonal Pond Tips

    Case Study: Shoreline Restoration With Erosion Control Technology

    by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Jan 21, 2020

    Industrial businesses can affect communities in very positive ways; however, there are exceptions. Certain business practices can have a negative environmental impact on our communities. This was the case for one Florida Keys community. Due to the actions of a nearby blasting company, 5-7 ft of their lake’s bank eroded away.

    Luckily, SOLitude Lake Management specializes in the restoration of eroded shorelines to prevent water quality issues from reoccurring. There are many benefits to implementing erosion control solutions, including filtering hazardous runoff, repairing potholes in the dirt, and immediately reclaiming lost property. And what’s unique about our strategy is that we utilize a bioengineered living shoreline, which is a healthier and more effective alternative than previous industry standards like cement bags or concrete.

    We applied these tools on our Florida Keys community. The first step in restoring their 1,850 ft shoreline involved removing floating mats of the invasive aquatic weeds growing 3-5 ft out around the entire shoreline. This included torpedograss, cattails, primrose and alligatorweed. Overgrown invasive species often indicate neglect and can inhibit the growth and prosperity of animals and plants in the native ecosystems.

    SOX Erosion Solutions, Before, During and After
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    Topics: Pond Management Best Practices, Buffer Management, Stormwater BMPs

    Top 10 Pond Management Articles of 2019... Hint, #1 is Slimy & Toxic!

    by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Jan 07, 2020

    blog-top-articles

    That's a wrap! What a year it has been. In honor of the new year, we gathered all of our educational articles and picked the top 10 most-viewed of 2019. Read our most popular articles covering toxic algae, aquatic weed control, fisheries and wildlife management and new innovations and technologies.

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    Topics: Water Quality/Nutrient Remediation, Aquatic Weeds and Algae, Fisheries Management, Pond Management Best Practices, Published Articles

    Benefits of Professional, In-House Water Quality Testing Labs

    by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Dec 10, 2019

    water quality lab

    Written by Sam Sardes, Laboratory Manager and Weed Science Director

    If you were sick, would you perform an at-home blood test or would you count on an experienced medical professional? Most of us would choose the expertise of a doctor or nurse. Water quality testing should be viewed in the same vein.

    Picturesque lakes and ponds don’t occur by accident. In most cases, they are the result of rigorous, comprehensive aquatic management plans. And water quality testing is often considered the backbone of these successful programs. Like a blood sample, water quality testing can reveal a plethora of information about the status of a waterbody, which can be used to diagnose problems and design custom solutions.

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    Topics: Water Quality/Nutrient Remediation, Pond Management Best Practices

    Choose a Perfect Lake & Pond Aeration System with Bathymetric Mapping

    by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Dec 03, 2019

    lake-mapping-survey-bathymetry

    One of the great tools in a lake manager’s tool box is the use of submersed aeration. Sub­mersed lake and pond aeration adds oxy­gen directly into the water column and involves the mixing of water to increase exposure to atmospheric oxygen, thus, decreasing harmful gases like hydrogen sulfide with in the waterbody. This proactive management solution significantly helps promote positive changes in lakes and ponds; however, aeration sys­tems must be properly sized and placed in order for aquatic ecosystems to fully reap the benefits. Surface mapping used in con­junction with depth-sensing technology, such as bathymetry, can help determine the correct size and location of aeration systems to ensure the entire waterbody is receiving adequate oxygenation. 

    Submersed pond aerators use diffused air to push water from the bottom of the pond to the surface, where it can be exposed to the atmosphere. The water on the surface then gets displaced and driven down to the bottom of the pond, creating circulation and mixing from top to bottom. This mixing creates a more uniform and oxygenated body of water.

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    Topics: Pond Management Best Practices, Lake Mapping and Bathymetry