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    New Innovative Solutions in Your Lake Manager’s ‘Toolbox’

    by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Sep 19, 2019

    Golf-1

    AS SEEN IN Turf Magazine: Written by Shannon Junior, Ecologist

    Herbicides and algaecides have traditionally been used to maintain balanced ecosystems in lakes and ponds—but wouldn’t it be exciting if there was a new technology or process that could totally revolutionize the way we approach environmental problems in our communities? Industry leaders have long understood that proactive, holistic management strategies are the key to achieve long-term balance in our aquatic environments; however, our toolbox of sustainable lake management solutions has not always grown at the same pace as our knowledge. That’s why we are so excited about recent advances in aquatic habitat restoration.

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    Topics: Water Quality/Nutrient Remediation, Aquatic Weeds and Algae, Invasive Species, Published Articles

    Case Study: New Highly-Selective Herbicide Used to Eradicate Milfoil

    by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   May 28, 2019

    variable-milfoil-eradication-case-study

    Written by Peter Beisler, Environmental Scientist

    Variable milfoil (Myriophyllum heterophyllum) is a highly invasive exotic plant that is threatening our freshwater ecosystems. If left unmanaged, it not only has the ability to impair ecological balance, but will readily spread throughout a waterbody and to surrounding waterbodies, as it can easily be transported by heavy downstream water flow and on the boats and trailers of unsuspecting boaters.

    SOLitude has been managing variable milfoil for quite some time in Back Bay, a 34-acre bay located on Lake Winnipesaukee in Wolfeboro, New Hampshire. The relatively shallow bay serves as a valuable resource to the surrounding community by providing excellent fish and wildlife habitat, as well as recreational opportunities, such as fishing, boating, wildlife viewing, a competitive tournament water skiing course/jump and a designated model sailboat racing area.

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    Topics: Aquatic Weeds and Algae, Invasive Species

    Plant Doppelgangers: Invasive Plants Often Mistaken for Other Species

    by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Feb 28, 2019

    Lotus - SOLitude Lake Management

    Written by Industry Expert Brea Arvidson, Aquatic Biologist

    Regions across the US are waging war on invasive aquatic plants, with a particular focus on preserving water access and usage. Unless designed for a specific safety purpose, waterbodies are supposed to support aquatic biota, including plants. However, many of these invading species are often mistaken for native plants that are important for a balanced or natural ecosystem. How can pond owners, community associations, and recreational users distinguish between them? What signs help reveal that a plant is ‘invasive’?

    Foremost, a large amount of growth in a confined area can be a primary indicator of an unbalanced plant community – often suggesting non-native or invasive growth. Dense growth removes open-water habitat or may decrease the potential species diversity a system can support. Understanding a balance of biota is also key to preserving or restoring an aquatic ecosystem.

    Action towards awareness of invaders is also important. Questioning whether or not a species is supposed to be in the waterbody is a great step to take, especially when widespread or ‘new’ growth is present. New plant growth in a lake or pond may indicate the presence of an invasive species, potentially brought in by recreation, urban development or wildlife.

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    Topics: Aquatic Weeds and Algae, Invasive Species

    Upland, Wetland & Aquatic Plants Every Turf Manager Should Know About

    by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Feb 26, 2019

    private-golf-course-lake-pond-management

    Written by Industry Expert David Riedl, Environmental Scientist

    Not only are turf managers responsible for the land, but quite often are tasked with overseeing the maintenance of the waterbodies on the property as well. Pond maintenance, in combination with turf management, opens the door to a plethora of issues most turf managers might not know how to address. However, simply knowing how to identify a few types of aquatic vegetation within a waterbody can help turf managers maintain a healthy property.

    Shoreline Vegetation 

    The first type of vegetation turf managers should be aware of is shoreline vegetation. A few notable examples can cause stress to turf managers.

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    Topics: Invasive Species, Pond Management Best Practices

    Invasive Species Highlight: Mudmat

    by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Oct 23, 2018

    Mud Mat_NAPMS

    AS SEEN IN Northeast Aquatic Plant Management Society Nor’Easter Newsletter

    Written by Industry Experts Emily Mayer, Aquatic Biologist and Kate Arnao, seasonal team member 

    As its name suggests, mudmat (Glossostigma cleistanthum) is an invasive aquatic plant species that forms dense, green mats in littoral zones. The iconic bunny ear-shaped leaves of mudmat serve as a unique characteristic when identifying this species. The leaves grow in pairs along thin rhizomes, with narrowing stems at the base and widen into an oval shape at the tips.

    Mudmat can thrive both as a submerged and emergent plant depending upon the location within the waterbody. This species generally prefers oligotrophic conditions, consisting of high transparency readings, low pH, and low pond nutrients. They can form “carpet-like” mats along the bottom of waterbodies, averaging from 10,000 to 25,000 plants per square meter, and can reach depths of up to two meters.

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    Topics: Aquatic Weeds and Algae, Invasive Species

    Are Zebra Mussels Harmful?

    by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Oct 04, 2018

    Eurasian Milfoil & Zebra Mussels_Seneca Lakes NY_Kevin S_08.16 (2)_c-825016-edited

    Written by Industry Expert Bob Schindler, Aquatic Biologist

    Ecological impacts, habitat distinctions, and sustainable management options for Zebra and Quagga mussels in freshwater environments

    Widespread occurrences of both Zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) and Quagga mussels (D. rostriformis bugensis) have been well documented since their initial confirmation within the Great Lakes during 1986 and 1991, respectively. These two species of invasive aquatic shellfish have been a focus of research and public education as their infestations have rapidly expanded to include a major portion of the Northeastern United States, along with localized infestations now confirmed west of the Rockies. While many of the significant ecological impacts are mutually shared between both species of mussel, there are key morphological and potential habitat distinctions that can aid in identifying the threat level of introduction, especially within small lake and pond environments.

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    Topics: Invasive Species, Nature's Creatures

    Common Nuisance & Invasive Plants You May Be Mistaking for Waterlilies

    by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Sep 04, 2018

    Yellow waterlily_white waterlily_watershield

    Yellow waterlily, white waterlily and watershield can play important roles in aquatic ecosystems when managed properly. 

    When you look out at your lake or pond, you may see some floating, broad-leaved plant species. The most common native species with floating leaves are yellow waterlily (Nuphar variegata), white waterlily (Nymphaea odorata) and watershield (Brasenia schreberi). Depending on region, waterlilies and watershield can be found inhabiting the shallow littoral zones of lakes and ponds, often covering the surface of these waterbodies with floating leaves and flowers. When managed properly, these species occupy an important ecological niche by creating habitat and providing food for aquatic organisms. However, several nuisance and invasive plants share physical characteristics with these beneficial species, making incorrect identification an easy—and potentially catastrophic—mistake. These nuisance and invasive plants rapidly out compete native species, can negatively impact the ecology of the aquatic habitats they invade and can drastically diminish the recreational and aesthetic value of your lake or pond.

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    Topics: Aquatic Weeds and Algae, Invasive Species

    Invasive Species Highlight: Water Chestnut

    by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Aug 06, 2018

    Water Chestnut

    Water chestnut has invaded waterways from Canada to Virginia along the East Coast since its introduction in the 1870s. Water chestnut can be identified by its triangular serrated floating leaves arranged in a rosette pattern, radiating from a central stalk. The stalk is rooted to the bottom substrate and covered in feathery submersed leaves.

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    Topics: Aquatic Weeds and Algae, Invasive Species

    Invasive Species Highlight: Alligatorweed

    by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Jul 05, 2018

    Alligatorweed

    Written by Industry Expert Eric Carnall, Environmental Scientist 

    Alligatorweed (Alternanthera philoxeroides) is a perennial plant native to South America. It was first reported in the United States in 1897. Listed as a prohibited aquatic weed in many states, its growth has caused significant economic and ecological damage throughout the Southern United States.

    Alligatorweed reproduces in North America primarily through vegetative propagation, but seeds have been found as well. Morphologically speaking, alligatorweed can be varied based on the surrounding environment; in fact, it has adapted to grow in both aquatic ecosystems and xeric (desert) habitats. Typically, this invasive plant can be identified by its

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    Topics: Aquatic Weeds and Algae, Invasive Species

    Case Study: Managing Invasive Water Soldier in a Canadian Waterway

    by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Apr 09, 2018

    Water Soldier

    Written by Industry Expert Glenn Sullivan, Environmental Scientist

    The only known Water Soldier infestation in North America...

    Canada’s Trent-Severn Waterway provides a link between Lake Ontario in the southeast and Georgian Bay in the northwest, allowing boat navigation for its entire 240- mile length through a system of rivers and lakes, and 41 locks. Water Soldier (Stratoides aloides), an invasive aquatic plant that forms impenetrable mats on the water surface, infested an area of approximately 700 acres within the Trent-Severn Waterway. The infestation was first reported in the Trent River, in September of 2008, and is considered the only known Water Soldier infestation in all of North America.

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    Topics: Aquatic Weeds and Algae, Invasive Species