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Invasive Species Highlight: Water Chestnut

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Aug 06, 2018

Water Chestnut

Water chestnut has invaded waterways from Canada to Virginia along the East Coast since its introduction in the 1870s. Water chestnut can be identified by its triangular serrated floating leaves arranged in a rosette pattern, radiating from a central stalk. The stalk is rooted to the bottom substrate and covered in feathery submersed leaves.

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Topics: Aquatic Weeds and Algae, Invasive Species

Invasive Species Highlight: Alligatorweed

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Jul 05, 2018

Alligatorweed

Written by Industry Expert Eric Carnall, Environmental Scientist 

Alligatorweed (Alternanthera philoxeroides) is a perennial plant native to South America. It was first reported in the United States in 1897. Listed as a prohibited aquatic weed in many states, its growth has caused significant economic and ecological damage throughout the Southern United States.

Alligatorweed reproduces in North America primarily through vegetative propagation, but seeds have been found as well. Morphologically speaking, alligatorweed can be varied based on the surrounding environment; in fact, it has adapted to grow in both aquatic ecosystems and xeric (desert) habitats. Typically, this invasive plant can be identified by its

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Topics: Aquatic Weeds and Algae, Invasive Species

Case Study: Managing Invasive Water Soldier in a Canadian Waterway

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Apr 09, 2018

Water Soldier

Written by Industry Expert Glenn Sullivan, Environmental Scientist

The only known Water Soldier infestation in North America...

Canada’s Trent-Severn Waterway provides a link between Lake Ontario in the southeast and Georgian Bay in the northwest, allowing boat navigation for its entire 240- mile length through a system of rivers and lakes, and 41 locks. Water Soldier (Stratoides aloides), an invasive aquatic plant that forms impenetrable mats on the water surface, infested an area of approximately 700 acres within the Trent-Severn Waterway. The infestation was first reported in the Trent River, in September of 2008, and is considered the only known Water Soldier infestation in all of North America.

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Topics: Aquatic Weeds and Algae, Invasive Species

A Homeowner’s Guide to Aquatic Hitchhikers

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Mar 01, 2018

Duckweed

Written by Industry Expert Josh Perry, Environmental Scientist

Do you know what costs homeowner’s associations, small communities and government agencies over 120 billion dollars annually? The answer is invasive species. Far beyond the monetary costs, invasive species create unsightly, unbalanced and unhealthy aquatic ecosystems. Unfortunately, human activity is responsible for most infestations. Whether you’re a part of a lake community, live near a stormwater pond or even own a decorative backyard water garden, we all play pivotal roles in spreading—but also preventing—invasive aquatic species.

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Topics: Aquatic Weeds and Algae, Invasive Species

Nuisance Aquatic Plant Highlight: Fanwort

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Oct 23, 2017

Written by Industry Expert Brea Arvidson, Aquatic Biologist

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Topics: Aquatic Weeds and Algae, Invasive Species

Combating Invasive Species While Protecting Native Plants Downstream

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Oct 12, 2017

Written by Industry Expert Amanda Mahaney, Aquatic Biologist

FanwortAgawam Mill Pond, located in Wareham, Massachusetts, is a 150-acre waterbody owned by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and is managed by the MA Division of Fish and Wildlife (MA DFG). It is used heavily for recreational activities, such as boating, fishing and swimming, and supports moderate residential development. The pond has an average depth of six to eight feet with a maximum depth of twelve feet; therefore, emergent and submerged aquatic vegetation has the capability to flourish, rapidly expanding into dense colonies. Currently, the invasive, non-indigenous submersed vegetation (fanwort and variable watermilfoil) has inundated the pond causing a decline in water quality and has severely limited recreational activities for residents and guests.

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Topics: Aquatic Weeds and Algae, Invasive Species

The Vectors of Invasive Phragmites Spread & Effective Control Methods

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Aug 15, 2017

Written by Industry Expert Richard Ruby III, Aquatic Biologist

PhragmitesPlants become classified as invasive species when they invade areas outside of their native range, upset the natural community they have invaded and cause considerable damage to either the ecology or economy of an area. Phragmites australis, or common reed, is a plant that most definitely meets all of these criteria. Native to Europe and Asia, invasive Phragmites is an aggressive colonizer of a variety of wetland habitats across the United States. Once established, the nuisance plant’s growth habits allow it to quickly outcompete most native species, ultimately creating a dense monoculture which reduces species richness and overall habitat value. As a result of these invasive characteristics, Phragmites has become a significant threat to freshwater and coastal wetlands across the country.

Whether managing established Phragmites colonies or endeavoring to prevent its introduction, it is critically important to understand the plant’s methods of reproduction and dispersal. Phragmites is spread through several means, called vectors. The natural reproduction of Phragmites is accomplished in three ways: by seed, rhizome fragmentation and the use of stolons. Seeds can be spread by the wind, wetland birds, surface currents and wave action as well as on recreational and construction vehicles. Expansion through the development of stolons (lateral vegetative growth of the stem), also allows for very rapid spread of the infestation. Rhizomes, the underground root structures of the plant, when fragmented through land disturbance or other natural processes such as erosion, have the potential to become re-rooted in any suitable area they are deposited. ATVs and construction vehicles can also be vectors of rhizomal spread if the root debris is not removed when leaving a Phragmites infested area.

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Topics: Invasive Species, Buffer Management

Nuisance Aquatic Plant Highlight: Watermeal

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Aug 10, 2017

Written by Industry Expert Amanda Mahaney, Aquatic Biologist

Watermeal_Woes_pic1_cropped_e.jpg“What is that green scum on the surface of my pond?”

Is this a question you have asked yourself before? If so, further investigations are in order. It may not be “green scum” or pond algae after all, but rather a tiny plant called watermeal, with no roots, stems or “true” leaves. By simply rubbing this tiny, pale green plant between your fingers, it will most likely resemble cornmeal.

Watermeal prefers slow-moving or stagnant, nutrient-rich waterbodies and is frequently found among its closest relative, duckweed (Lemna spp.). Although it is commonly used as a food source and camouflage cover for wildlife, it can easily develop dense mats when proper conditions allow for it. Sunlight penetration necessary for aquatic vegetation growth and oxygen concentrations essential for the health of underwater wildlife can all be negatively affected by concentrated growth of watermeal and duckweed.

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Topics: Aquatic Weeds and Algae, Invasive Species

Invasive Species Removal: Restoration of a Coastal Freshwater Pond

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Jun 05, 2017

AS SEEN IN Land and Water Magazine: Written by Industry Expert Keith Gazaille, Senior Biologist and Regional Director

Mckill Pond_Cover_e.jpgEffective Control and Removal of Non-Native and Invasive Plants to Restore Open Water and Wetland Habitats

Project Background
The Mickill Pond system is a freshwater pond group located on a 15-acre private property at the southern tip of Westerly, Rhode Island, in an area known as Watch Hill. The ponds are separated from Block Island Sound by an approximate 250-foot-wide coastal dune and beach. Given the increasing development of the Rhode Island seacoast, this freshwater pond system represents a unique and desirable wetland habitat feature for the area and the state. Over the last decade, the ponds and associated wetlands became infested with non-native and invasive plant growth, specifically, common reed (Phragmites australis), porcelain berry (Ampelopsis brevipedunculata) and Japanese honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica). These species developed dense monotypic stands throughout the wetland areas and significantly encroached on the ponded areas, reducing open water. As a result of this invasive species colonization and the subsequent loss of species diversity and richness, the property owner sought to develop a project to control the invasive plant growth, restore open water and increase a diverse native plant assemblage.

Site Assessment & Plan Design
Coastal freshwater wetlands support many desirable and even rare native plant and animal species; therefore, the introduction and expansion of invasive plant growth threatens the resources’ ability to provide the habitats necessary for these species to flourish. In order to design an appropriate wetland restoration plan, the project team first cataloged plant species and mapped existing habitat zones.

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Topics: Invasive Species, Published Articles

Invasive Species Highlight: Starry Stonewort

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   May 30, 2017

Written by Industry Expert Shannon Junior, Aquatic Ecologist and Senior Business Development Consultant

starry-stonewort-d.jpgStarry stonewort (Nitellopsis obtusa) is a species of macroscopic green algae in the Characeae family. It was first discovered in the United States in 1978 in the St. Lawrence River, but has since spread to Michigan, New York, Indiana, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Minnesota and Vermont. When the algae were first discovered in new areas, they were often misidentified as less invasive native species of macroscopic algae. However, the growth habit of starry stonewort is much more aggressive and robust, and can reach nuisance abundances. These nuisance plants can reduce the growth of desirable aquatic vegetation, reduce suitable fish habitat and cause fishing frustration. Although the algae are non-vascular and have no true plant structures, they have been found to grow as much as eight feet tall. The blooms have severe negative impacts on the habitats where they occur, and have posed unique challenges for lake managers in these areas.

Now that the presence of starry stonewort has become more familiar to lake managers, it is actually quite easy to identify. The blooms appear more “raggedy” than other macroscopic algae species, and have much greater height and biomass. They are also characterized by distinctive “starry” rhizoids, also known as bulbils, which are the reproductive structures of the pond algae. The blooms are very transient, and are subject to a “boom and bust” phenomenon where large blooms will crash suddenly and unpredictably. This can cause hazardous low dissolved oxygen conditions in the waterbodies where it occurs.

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Topics: Aquatic Weeds and Algae, Invasive Species

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