Contact Us
New Call-to-action

Invasive Species Highlight: Mudmat

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Oct 23, 2018

Mud Mat_NAPMS

AS SEEN IN Northeast Aquatic Plant Management Society Nor’Easter Newsletter

Written by Industry Experts Emily Mayer, Aquatic Biologist and Kate Arnao, seasonal team member 

As its name suggests, mudmat (Glossostigma cleistanthum) is an invasive aquatic plant species that forms dense, green mats in littoral zones. The iconic bunny ear-shaped leaves of mudmat serve as a unique characteristic when identifying this species. The leaves grow in pairs along thin rhizomes, with narrowing stems at the base and widen into an oval shape at the tips.

Mudmat can thrive both as a submerged and emergent plant depending upon the location within the waterbody. This species generally prefers oligotrophic conditions, consisting of high transparency readings, low pH, and low pond nutrients. They can form “carpet-like” mats along the bottom of waterbodies, averaging from 10,000 to 25,000 plants per square meter, and can reach depths of up to two meters.

Read More

Topics: Aquatic Weeds and Algae, Invasive Species

Are Zebra Mussels Harmful?

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Oct 04, 2018

Eurasian Milfoil & Zebra Mussels_Seneca Lakes NY_Kevin S_08.16 (2)_c-825016-edited

Written by Industry Expert Bob Schindler, Aquatic Biologist

Ecological impacts, habitat distinctions, and sustainable management options for Zebra and Quagga mussels in freshwater environments

Widespread occurrences of both Zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) and Quagga mussels (D. rostriformis bugensis) have been well documented since their initial confirmation within the Great Lakes during 1986 and 1991, respectively. These two species of invasive aquatic shellfish have been a focus of research and public education as their infestations have rapidly expanded to include a major portion of the Northeastern United States, along with localized infestations now confirmed west of the Rockies. While many of the significant ecological impacts are mutually shared between both species of mussel, there are key morphological and potential habitat distinctions that can aid in identifying the threat level of introduction, especially within small lake and pond environments.

Read More

Topics: Nature's Creatures, Invasive Species

Common Nuisance & Invasive Plants You May Be Mistaking for Waterlilies

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Sep 04, 2018

Yellow waterlily_white waterlily_watershield

Yellow waterlily, white waterlily and watershield can play important roles in aquatic ecosystems when managed properly. 

When you look out at your lake or pond, you may see some floating, broad-leaved plant species. The most common native species with floating leaves are yellow waterlily (Nuphar variegata), white waterlily (Nymphaea odorata) and watershield (Brasenia schreberi). Depending on region, waterlilies and watershield can be found inhabiting the shallow littoral zones of lakes and ponds, often covering the surface of these waterbodies with floating leaves and flowers. When managed properly, these species occupy an important ecological niche by creating habitat and providing food for aquatic organisms. However, several nuisance and invasive plants share physical characteristics with these beneficial species, making incorrect identification an easy—and potentially catastrophic—mistake. These nuisance and invasive plants rapidly out compete native species, can negatively impact the ecology of the aquatic habitats they invade and can drastically diminish the recreational and aesthetic value of your lake or pond.

Read More

Topics: Invasive Species, Aquatic Weeds and Algae

Invasive Species Highlight: Water Chestnut

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Aug 06, 2018

Water Chestnut

Water chestnut has invaded waterways from Canada to Virginia along the East Coast since its introduction in the 1870s. Water chestnut can be identified by its triangular serrated floating leaves arranged in a rosette pattern, radiating from a central stalk. The stalk is rooted to the bottom substrate and covered in feathery submersed leaves.

Read More

Topics: Invasive Species, Aquatic Weeds and Algae

Invasive Species Highlight: Alligatorweed

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Jul 05, 2018

Alligatorweed

Written by Industry Expert Eric Carnall, Environmental Scientist 

Alligatorweed (Alternanthera philoxeroides) is a perennial plant native to South America. It was first reported in the United States in 1897. Listed as a prohibited aquatic weed in many states, its growth has caused significant economic and ecological damage throughout the Southern United States.

Alligatorweed reproduces in North America primarily through vegetative propagation, but seeds have been found as well. Morphologically speaking, alligatorweed can be varied based on the surrounding environment; in fact, it has adapted to grow in both aquatic ecosystems and xeric (desert) habitats. Typically, this invasive plant can be identified by its

Read More

Topics: Invasive Species, Aquatic Weeds and Algae

Case Study: Managing Invasive Water Soldier in a Canadian Waterway

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Apr 09, 2018

Water Soldier

Written by Industry Expert Glenn Sullivan, Environmental Scientist

The only known Water Soldier infestation in North America...

Canada’s Trent-Severn Waterway provides a link between Lake Ontario in the southeast and Georgian Bay in the northwest, allowing boat navigation for its entire 240- mile length through a system of rivers and lakes, and 41 locks. Water Soldier (Stratoides aloides), an invasive aquatic plant that forms impenetrable mats on the water surface, infested an area of approximately 700 acres within the Trent-Severn Waterway. The infestation was first reported in the Trent River, in September of 2008, and is considered the only known Water Soldier infestation in all of North America.

Read More

Topics: Invasive Species, Aquatic Weeds and Algae

A Homeowner’s Guide to Aquatic Hitchhikers

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Mar 01, 2018

Duckweed

Written by Industry Expert Josh Perry, Environmental Scientist

Do you know what costs homeowner’s associations, small communities and government agencies over 120 billion dollars annually? The answer is invasive species. Far beyond the monetary costs, invasive species create unsightly, unbalanced and unhealthy aquatic ecosystems. Unfortunately, human activity is responsible for most infestations. Whether you’re a part of a lake community, live near a stormwater pond or even own a decorative backyard water garden, we all play pivotal roles in spreading—but also preventing—invasive aquatic species.

Read More

Topics: Invasive Species, Aquatic Weeds and Algae

Nuisance Aquatic Plant Highlight: Fanwort

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Oct 23, 2017

Written by Industry Expert Brea Arvidson, Aquatic Biologist

FanwortWhat’s purple and green, with a little white flower? Fanwort: it’s a competitive aquatic plant that grows in dense mat-forming patches. Its submersed leaves are its name-sake — dissected into a thin, flat fan-shaped display. The submersed leaves grow approximately 5 cm across and appear in opposite pairings on the stem. Small, diamond-shaped floating leaves are sometimes present at maturity, growing up to 3 cm long, but only 4 mm wide. The 3-petaled flower is inconspicuous and typically blossoms right at the water’s surface.

Read More

Topics: Aquatic Weeds and Algae, Invasive Species

Combating Invasive Species While Protecting Native Plants Downstream

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Oct 12, 2017

Written by Industry Expert Amanda Mahaney, Aquatic Biologist

FanwortAgawam Mill Pond, located in Wareham, Massachusetts, is a 150-acre waterbody owned by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and is managed by the MA Division of Fish and Wildlife (MA DFG). It is used heavily for recreational activities, such as boating, fishing and swimming, and supports moderate residential development. The pond has an average depth of six to eight feet with a maximum depth of twelve feet; therefore, emergent and submerged aquatic vegetation has the capability to flourish, rapidly expanding into dense colonies. Currently, the invasive, non-indigenous submersed vegetation (fanwort and variable watermilfoil) has inundated the pond causing a decline in water quality and has severely limited recreational activities for residents and guests.

Read More

Topics: Aquatic Weeds and Algae, Invasive Species

The Vectors of Invasive Phragmites Spread & Effective Control Methods

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Aug 15, 2017

PhragmitesPlants become classified as invasive species when they invade areas outside of their native range, upset the natural community they have invaded and cause considerable damage to either the ecology or economy of an area. Phragmites australis, or common reed, is a plant that most definitely meets all of these criteria. Native to Europe and Asia, invasive Phragmites is an aggressive colonizer of a variety of wetland habitats across the United States. Once established, the nuisance plant’s growth habits allow it to quickly outcompete most native species, ultimately creating a dense monoculture which reduces species richness and overall habitat value. As a result of these invasive characteristics, Phragmites has become a significant threat to freshwater and coastal wetlands across the country.

Whether managing established Phragmites colonies or endeavoring to prevent its introduction, it is critically important to understand the plant’s methods of reproduction and dispersal. Phragmites is spread through several means, called vectors. The natural reproduction of Phragmites is accomplished in three ways: by seed, rhizome fragmentation and the use of stolons. Seeds can be spread by the wind, wetland birds, surface currents and wave action as well as on recreational and construction vehicles. Expansion through the development of stolons (lateral vegetative growth of the stem), also allows for very rapid spread of the infestation. Rhizomes, the underground root structures of the plant, when fragmented through land disturbance or other natural processes such as erosion, have the potential to become re-rooted in any suitable area they are deposited. ATVs and construction vehicles can also be vectors of rhizomal spread if the root debris is not removed when leaving a Phragmites infested area.

Read More

Topics: Invasive Species, Buffer Management

Use the search box to browse our blog
6 Key Reasons To Invest In A Professional Fisheries Management Company How To Restore Lake And Pond Water Quality Through Nutrient Management

Subscribe To Blog

Latest Blog Posts