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    Case Study: Nanobubble Aeration Transforms a Golf Course Lake in FL

    by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Aug 15, 2019

    Nanobubble Aeration

    Nanobubble aeration is an exciting new technology that is helping restore water quality in some of the most problematic lakes and ponds. One such lake that greatly benefitted from the infusion of these tiny bubbles is located in a large development district in Bonita Springs, FL. This 1.3-acre lake was persistently plagued by multiple species of algae—including filamentous green algae and potentially toxic cyanobacteria (blue-green algae). The pond is located adjacent to a golf course and has multiple homes around its perimeter, making water quality restoration a priority. Historically, the 8 ft deep lake underwent extensive algaecide treatments with little long-term success.

    Due to difficulties faced in conventional control management, the lake was deemed a candidate for control using new nanobubble aeration technology. Nanobubble technology is designed to exceed the oxygenation capabilities of traditional aeration systems.

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    Topics: Aquatic Weeds and Algae, Aeration

    7 Tips to Help Protect Your Family & Pets From Dangerous Toxic Algae

    by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Aug 13, 2019

    Holding down the fort_CloudsandDog_Timberlake_ColumbiaMissouri_BrentW_05-2016-1-1

    Over the weekend, there were several cases reported of dogs passing away after swimming in lakes and ponds containing toxic algae. Though public knowledge about Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) is increasing, many remain unaware of the dangerous effects HABs can have on pets, wildlife and humans. Common experiences include skin rashes, liver and kidney toxicity, nervous system problems, and respiratory complications. In more severe cases, exposure or digestion of these toxins can be deadly and has suspected links to degenerative diseases like ALS, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.

    Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) can occur naturally, but have been a problem for decades due to the negative environmental impacts associated with urban development, mass agriculture and pollution. To help limit the growth of HABs in your community waterbodies, SOLitude Lake Management®, an industry leader in lake, stormwater pond, wetland and fisheries management services, recommends the following sustainable tips to homeowners, golf courses and municipalities:

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    Topics: Water Quality/Nutrient Remediation, Aquatic Weeds and Algae

    Harmful Algal Blooms May Cause Summer Lake Closures

    by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Aug 08, 2019

    Cyanobacteria-1-1

    Sometimes you get sick. Did you know your lake can too? You may stumble upon a “closed” sign at your favorite spot on the water and wonder why is my lake closed? Just as you can get sick if you fail to properly take care of yourself, it’s also possible for your lake or pond’s health to suffer without proper management, requiring swimming, fishing and other recreation to be put on hold while water quality is restored.

    One of the most common reasons your waterbody may be closed is the presence of certain algal species. While many forms of algae are harmless, certain species known as cyanobacteria (often referred to as blue-green algae) may develop. If left unmanaged, these harmful algal blooms (HABs) can become so severe that they produce toxins that are harmful to wildlife, livestock, pets and public health. Suitable conditions that encourage these HABs include: warm water temperatures, increased pH levels, stagnant water, an abundance of light exposure and excessive nutrient levels. Environmental scientists are still learning about the specific effects of toxin exposure, but evidence suggests harmful algal bloom toxins may lead to the development of neurological, physiological and respiratory problems—and, in extreme cases, even death.

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    Topics: Water Quality/Nutrient Remediation, Aquatic Weeds and Algae

    What We Can Learn from the Worst Algae Catastrophes in History

    by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Jul 10, 2019

    Harmful Algal Blooms-740481-edited

    Written by Greg Blackham, Aquatic Specialist

    Cyanobacteria, often referred to as blue-green algae, are changing the way providers of green consulting services approach algae management in lakes and ponds. Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) treatments reached an all-time high in 2018. HABs have the potential to be highly toxic and can severely impact the health and wellbeing of all nearby humans, pets and wildlife. The devastating effects of harmful algal blooms have been witnessed repeatedly throughout the US over the past 10 years. There is no area of the country that is safe from threat of HABs, as two recent catastrophes from very different parts of the country show us. We can, however, learn from these natural ecological disasters and implement proactive lake management strategies to help avoid them in the future.

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    Topics: Water Quality/Nutrient Remediation, Aquatic Weeds and Algae

    10 Tips to Protect Your Water Resources and Community This Summer

    by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Jun 12, 2019

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    Summer means longer, sunnier days filled with fishing, boating and other outdoor activities. But as the warm weather arrives, it can create conditions that may be dangerous for the health and well-being of your family and the environment. Implementing the following proactive and sustainable strategies—or working with your homeowners association, parks service or municipality to do so—can help prevent harmful algal blooms, nuisance mosquitoes and the spread of dangerous invasive plants throughout the summer.

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    Topics: Aquatic Weeds and Algae, Mosquito and Pest Control

    Case Study: New Highly-Selective Herbicide Used to Eradicate Milfoil

    by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   May 28, 2019

    variable-milfoil-eradication-case-study

    Written by Peter Beisler, Environmental Scientist

    Variable milfoil (Myriophyllum heterophyllum) is a highly invasive exotic plant that is threatening our freshwater ecosystems. If left unmanaged, it not only has the ability to impair ecological balance, but will readily spread throughout a waterbody and to surrounding waterbodies, as it can easily be transported by heavy downstream water flow and on the boats and trailers of unsuspecting boaters.

    SOLitude has been managing variable milfoil for quite some time in Back Bay, a 34-acre bay located on Lake Winnipesaukee in Wolfeboro, New Hampshire. The relatively shallow bay serves as a valuable resource to the surrounding community by providing excellent fish and wildlife habitat, as well as recreational opportunities, such as fishing, boating, wildlife viewing, a competitive tournament water skiing course/jump and a designated model sailboat racing area.

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    Topics: Aquatic Weeds and Algae, Invasive Species

    A Technological Break-Through in Sustainable Lake Management

    by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   May 21, 2019

    Nanobubbles - SOLitude

    Written by Industry Expert Bo Burns, Biologist & Market Development Manager

    Algae: it comes in many forms and colors. It’s slimy, stinky and can ruin the beauty and function of your golf course lakes and irrigation systems. It’s also one of the oldest known organisms on this planet, which might explain its knack for survival, even under the toughest conditions. Over time, golf courses and property management companies have learned to pick sides when it comes to the safe eradication of stubborn and harmful algal blooms—some in favor of natural management techniques; others in support of applying EPA-registered algaecides to ensure the job gets done. But this year, a new game changing technology will make the management of stubborn algae blooms a no-brainer with more long-lasting results that are beneficial for the environment.

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    Topics: Water Quality/Nutrient Remediation, Aquatic Weeds and Algae, Aeration

    Citizen Scientists: Using Your Smartphone to Enhance Lake Stewardship

    by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   May 01, 2019

    Citizen Scientist - SOLitude

    Written by Amanda Mahaney, Freshwater Biologist

    Understanding water as a finite natural resource has defined a century long debate about how to use it, maintain it, preserve it and protect it. Yet, despite these efforts, water quality has continuously declined across the country. Urban development near waterbodies often imparts negative impacts, such as nutrient loading and the spread of nuisance or invasive species. In order to solve a problem, lake management professionals first diagnose and document it using established procedures, but with poor environmental conditions on the rise, scientists cannot be everywhere at once.

    Enter your smartphone. With

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    Topics: Aquatic Weeds and Algae, Pond Management Best Practices

    Managing Golf Course Ponds Without Traditional Herbicides

    by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Apr 18, 2019

    Golf Course Pond - SOLitude

    AS SEEN IN Golf Course Management: Written by Benjamin Chen, Fisheries Biologist 

    Golf courses are picturesque with their landscaped green fairways and winding paths. While turf management is usually the first order of business for superintendents, lakes, ponds and water features aid in irrigation and help accentuate the beauty of the environment. Without proper management, however, they can cause water quality problems that may become a huge detriment to the golfing experience. In other words, if your greens and your ponds are the same color, we have a lot to talk about.

    Luckily, proactive strategies and new innovative technologies are making lake management without traditional herbicides or algaecides easier than ever—with results that last longer.

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    Topics: Aquatic Weeds and Algae, Published Articles, Buffer Management

    Using Human Dimensions in Aquatic Plant Management

    by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Apr 08, 2019

    Pond - SOLitude

    AS SEEN IN Bass Master: Written by Fisheries Biologist Vic DiCenzo, PhD

    Fisheries biologists consider aquatic plants to be an important component for healthy aquatic ecosystems. Aquatic plants serve a variety of functions including production of oxygen, recycling nutrients, reducing turbidity and providing food, spawning substrate and habitat for invertebrates and fish. However, while anglers and hunters favor an abundance of aquatic plants in reservoirs, many lake users prefer little to no vegetation. These differences challenge reservoir managers when developing management plans.

    A survey of 1,299 reservoirs in the U.S. identified excessive plant coverage was a management concern in only 10 percent of the reservoirs surveyed, and not enough plant coverage was a concern in more than 25 percent.

    How much aquatic vegetation should be in the lake? It depends on which stakeholder you ask. On U.S. reservoirs, stakeholders include anglers, hunters, boaters, swimmers, homeowners, commercial interests, wildlife watchers, state and federal agencies, real estate agents, just to name a few. Each of these groups likely has a unique tolerance for aquatic vegetation and reservoir managers must face the challenge of recognizing those differences.

    How do decision makers manage aquatic plants for different stakeholder values? Is there a level of plant coverage acceptable to all stakeholders? How do invasive species affect management options? What does a successful aquatic plant management plan look like?

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    Topics: Aquatic Weeds and Algae, Fisheries Management, Published Articles