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    New Innovative Solutions in Your Lake Manager’s ‘Toolbox’

    by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Sep 19, 2019

    Golf-1

    AS SEEN IN Turf Magazine: Written by Shannon Junior, Ecologist

    Herbicides and algaecides have traditionally been used to maintain balanced ecosystems in lakes and ponds—but wouldn’t it be exciting if there was a new technology or process that could totally revolutionize the way we approach environmental problems in our communities? Industry leaders have long understood that proactive, holistic management strategies are the key to achieve long-term balance in our aquatic environments; however, our toolbox of sustainable lake management solutions has not always grown at the same pace as our knowledge. That’s why we are so excited about recent advances in aquatic habitat restoration.

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    Topics: Water Quality/Nutrient Remediation, Aquatic Weeds and Algae, Invasive Species, Published Articles

    Research and Experimentation Leads to Fertilization Best-Practices

    by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Sep 17, 2019

    Water Testing

    Written by Ben German, Fisheries Biologist

    Scientific inquiry is often the driving force behind innovation, and continuing to analyze and fine-tune our management strategies helps us deliver the best service possible to our clients. Fisheries managers often use fertilization (or productivity manipulation) to increase the biological productivity of a lake or pond. The increase in nutrient concentrations spurs algae production, resulting in increased biomass at ascending trophic levels of the food web. In other words, more food equals bigger fish. Fertilizing has been a proven strategy for quite some time, but recent insights into nutrient ratios, and how to properly manage them, is bringing consistency to the process of producing trophy Largemouth Bass.

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    Stock Fish Ponds With Rainbow Trout Now for Winter Fun & Forage

    by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Sep 10, 2019

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    Written by Aquatic Biologist Chase Brown

    Lake, pond and fisheries management is often put on the back burner during the winter months as most sport fishing becomes slow, but one species thrives in colder conditions: rainbow trout. Rainbow trout offer a fun fight on a fly or rod and reel for anglers of any skill level—and they make excellent table-fare. No matter your waterbody, rainbow trout can be stocked for fishing and as an excellent source of forage for trophy fish in search of easy meals come springtime.

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    Topics: Fisheries Management, Fisheries Projects

    Nuisance Algae & Invasive Hydrilla Management in Community Ponds

    by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Sep 05, 2019

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    AS SEEN IN CAI Central Virginia's Consensus Magazine: Written by Kyle Finerfrock, Environmental Scientist

    Without proactive management in place, the resulting environmental conditions can spur a perfect storm of nuisance aquatic weeds and algae in your lake, stormwater pond or reservoir. Under unhealthy conditions, it is common to find invasive plants like hydrilla, which can compete with and choke out native vegetation. Poor water quality may also lead to the development of various forms of nuisance algae, as well as toxin-producing harmful algal blooms (HABs).

    Before you can implement a sustainable management plan to restore balance and beauty to the waterbody, it’s crucial to properly identify the species ailing your lake or pond. Hydrilla has several distinguishing characteristics. Its small leaves are arranged in whorls of three to eight, and these leaves are heavily serrated and can be seen without the aid of magnification. Reproduction typically occurs through fragmentation, although hydrilla also produces tubers, which are subterranean, potato-like structures. These tubers can stay dormant in the sediment for up to 12 years, causing significant challenges in eradication. Hydrilla forms dense
    mats at the surface of lakes and ponds, which limits recreational use and diminishes the aesthetic appeal of the waterbody. This invasive plant also out-competes native aquatic plant species, reducing biodiversity and negatively impacting water quality.

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    Topics: Aquatic Weeds and Algae, Pond Management Best Practices

    6 Tips to Help Prevent Mosquito-borne Diseases in Your Community

    by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Aug 29, 2019

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    This month, the first human case of Eastern Equine encephalitis (EEE) since 2013 was in reported in Massachusetts. Now, multiple New England communities are considered at “critical risk” of exposure to this mosquito-borne disease, which can cause flu-like symptoms, brain inflammation and, in severe cases, death. Though EEE has been detected in samples across multiple states, including Connecticut, Delaware, New Jersey, Virginia, Michigan, and Louisiana, historical data indicates that communities in Massachusetts, New York, and Florida are the most at risk. 

    To protect your family and community from EEE, as well as other viruses like Zika and West Nile Virus, SOLitude Lake Management recommends the following tips:

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    Topics: Pond Management Best Practices, Mosquito and Pest Control

    Know Your Surroundings: A Healthy Lake Begins Outside of the Water

    by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Aug 21, 2019

    Floating Fountain_SOLitude Lake Management-1

    AS SEEN IN Lawn and Landscape: Written by Paul Conti, Environmental Scientist and Regional Manager

    While all lakes, stormwater ponds, wetlands and fisheries are susceptible to water quality problems without proper management, the cause of these issues doesn’t always originate within the waterbody. Pond maintenance companies know that these complications often begin outside of the water. During precipitation events, water follows the course of gravity, either seeping into the earth to replenish groundwater or running across the ground as surface water runoff. The area of land that directs flowing water to lakes and ponds is called a “watershed.” As water travels across the watershed, it picks up and carries whatever is in its path—which can pose an enormous threat to your waterbody.

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    Topics: Pond Management Best Practices, Buffer Management

    Case Study: Nanobubble Aeration Transforms a Golf Course Lake in FL

    by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Aug 15, 2019

    Nanobubble Aeration

    Nanobubble aeration is an exciting new technology that is helping restore water quality in some of the most problematic lakes and ponds. One such lake that greatly benefitted from the infusion of these tiny bubbles is located in a large development district in Bonita Springs, FL. This 1.3-acre lake was persistently plagued by multiple species of algae—including filamentous green algae and potentially toxic cyanobacteria (blue-green algae). The pond is located adjacent to a golf course and has multiple homes around its perimeter, making water quality restoration a priority. Historically, the 8 ft deep lake underwent extensive algaecide treatments with little long-term success.

    Due to difficulties faced in conventional control management, the lake was deemed a candidate for control using new nanobubble aeration technology. Nanobubble technology is designed to exceed the oxygenation capabilities of traditional aeration systems.

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    Topics: Aquatic Weeds and Algae, Aeration

    7 Tips to Help Protect Your Family & Pets From Dangerous Toxic Algae

    by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Aug 13, 2019

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    Over the weekend, there were several cases reported of dogs passing away after swimming in lakes and ponds containing toxic algae. Though public knowledge about Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) is increasing, many remain unaware of the dangerous effects HABs can have on pets, wildlife and humans. Common experiences include skin rashes, liver and kidney toxicity, nervous system problems, and respiratory complications. In more severe cases, exposure or digestion of these toxins can be deadly and has suspected links to degenerative diseases like ALS, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.

    Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) can occur naturally, but have been a problem for decades due to the negative environmental impacts associated with urban development, mass agriculture and pollution. To help limit the growth of HABs in your community waterbodies, SOLitude Lake Management®, an industry leader in lake, stormwater pond, wetland and fisheries management services, recommends the following sustainable tips to homeowners, golf courses and municipalities:

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    Topics: Water Quality/Nutrient Remediation, Aquatic Weeds and Algae

    Harmful Algal Blooms May Cause Summer Lake Closures

    by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Aug 08, 2019

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    Sometimes you get sick. Did you know your lake can too? You may stumble upon a “closed” sign at your favorite spot on the water and wonder why is my lake closed? Just as you can get sick if you fail to properly take care of yourself, it’s also possible for your lake or pond’s health to suffer without proper management, requiring swimming, fishing and other recreation to be put on hold while water quality is restored.

    One of the most common reasons your waterbody may be closed is the presence of certain algal species. While many forms of algae are harmless, certain species known as cyanobacteria (often referred to as blue-green algae) may develop. If left unmanaged, these harmful algal blooms (HABs) can become so severe that they produce toxins that are harmful to wildlife, livestock, pets and public health. Suitable conditions that encourage these HABs include: warm water temperatures, increased pH levels, stagnant water, an abundance of light exposure and excessive nutrient levels. Environmental scientists are still learning about the specific effects of toxin exposure, but evidence suggests harmful algal bloom toxins may lead to the development of neurological, physiological and respiratory problems—and, in extreme cases, even death.

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    Topics: Water Quality/Nutrient Remediation, Aquatic Weeds and Algae

    Volunteers of the Quarter Collaborate on Lake Restoration Efforts

    by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Jul 30, 2019

    volunteer of the quarter- VOQ - Scott Dye - Errol Walsh-1

    Through SOLitude's volunteering and community outreach program, The SOLution, the company has named Assistant Regional Manager Errol Walsh and Aquatic Specialist Scott Dye as co-Volunteers of the Quarter for the second quarter of 2019. Based in Central Florida, the two have been active through recurring volunteer initiatives benefiting their local community of Seminole County.

    During the second quarter, Errol and Scott have volunteered extensively during weekends and in their personal time with the Seminole Education, Restoration, and Volunteer (SERV) Program, an organization that partners with local biologists, lake residents, and students to complete invasive species pulls, shoreline stabilization projects and other environmental restoration efforts. Collectively, Errol and Scott participated in seven events.

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    Topics: SOLitude News, The SOLution