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Pond Management: What are Beneficial Bacteria?

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Aug 04, 2016

Written by Industry Expert, Shannon Junior, Senior Business Development Consultant and Aquatic Ecologist 

Lake_Wildwood_Upton_MA_fan_wort__variable_milfoil_40_acres_JOnorato_06.15_e.jpgBeneficial bacteria occur naturally in lakes and ponds, and are the microbes responsible for processing dead organic material. There are many different types of bacteria, which work in different ways to break down organic compounds. Aerobic bacteria use oxygen and rapidly break down organic compounds. Anaerobic bacteria are able to work without oxygen, but work much more slowly. Both types of bacteria produce enzymes that allow them to break down organic compounds and take them into their cells as nutrients. Many bacteria also perform denitrification, transforming nitrate into nitrogen gas and removing it from the pond system. They can also convert soluble phosphorus from the water column into calcium phosphate and calcium iron phosphate, which are insoluble minerals that are not available to most types of pond algae.

Since the bacteria convert nutrients into unavailable forms, they can be beneficial in reducing nuisance algae blooms in lakes and ponds. In fresh water, phosphorus is generally the limiting nutrient for algal growth. The ratio of nitrogen to phosphorus determines the types of algae that will grow and thrive in a pond. In situations where there is excess phosphorus, nuisance species of filamentous and bluegreen algae (cyanobacteria) will dominate the waterbody instead of the beneficial planktonic green algae that form the base of the food web. The bacteria themselves can also contribute to the food web, becoming a food source for zooplankton and benthos, which then become food for fish and other organisms.

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Topics: Aquatic Weeds and Algae, Biological Augmentation

Phoslock and Biological Products for Improved Pond Water Quality

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   May 20, 2014

Phoslock_55lb_bag-1Excess nutrients and phosphorus in freshwater lead to poor pond water quality and recurring algae blooms. Phoslock permanently binds with available phosphorus in your water so that it is unavailable to fuel algae growth. Biological products, like beneficial aerobic bacteria, feed on excess nutrients in the water column, as well as the sludge on the bottom of your lake or pond, removing these potential sources for algae growth and improving water quality, clarity, and odor. Improve your water quality with products like Phoslock, Aquafix Nature's Liquid Balance and SOLitude's own, SOLICLEAR.

How To Restore Lake And Pond Water Quality Through Nutrient Management

Purchase Phoslock, Biologicals and other aquatic products for your lakes and ponds by visiting our online store.

 

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Topics: Water Quality/Nutrient Remediation, Aquatic Products, Biological Augmentation

Using Bacterial Products to Treat Lakes and Ponds

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Mar 05, 2014

From our trusted partners at Aquafix; by President Kevin Ripp

After a long cold winter, the ice that covers our lakes and ponds begins to melt and the bright spring sun begins to warm the water. The slow moving aquatic ecosystem starts becoming more active and alive. Plants, algae, and other aquatic life look for their chance to grab hold of the available nutrients and take control of your lake or pond.

One acquatic resource that can be used to combat the rapid growth phase of the winter warm up and set your pond up well for the new season is bacterial products. Bacterial products work by digesting decaying matter and consuming nitrogen and phosphate. Digesting excess organic matter and consuming excess nutrients helps to balance your lake or pond and create a natural healthy environment. Creating a healthy aquatic environment and addressing the root cause of a lake or ponds problems also helps to limit the potential need for algae control treatments.

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Topics: Water Quality/Nutrient Remediation, Pond Management Best Practices, Biological Augmentation

Bio-Dredging: Dredging With Bacteria?

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Mar 06, 2013

By Industry Expert Shannon Junior, Aquatic Ecologist

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Nitrosomonas

I want to start by saying that I really don’t like the term “Bio-Dredging”.  I think it’s a little confusing, and can mislead people into thinking they’re getting something they’re not.  But the term, short for Biological Dredging, has become the industry standard to describe the process of reducing organic sediments with large amounts of beneficial bacteria.

Beneficial bacteria occur naturally in ponds and lakes, and are the microbes responsible for processing dead organic material (i.e., decaying plant and animal matter).  There are many different types of these bacteria, which work in different ways to break down organic compounds.  Some of the bacteria produce enzymes that allow them to break down organic compounds and take them into their cells as nutrients.  Many bacteria also perform denitrification, transforming nitrate into nitrogen gas and removing it from the pond system.  They can also convert soluble phosphorus from the water column into insoluble minerals that are not available to most types of pond algae. 

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Topics: Pond Management Best Practices, Biological Augmentation

Dredging Your Pond: Planning for the Big Dig

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Aug 13, 2009

By Terry Owens, Environmental Scientist and Kimberly Niesel, CMCA, Director of Marketing

3D_lake_mapping_contour_bathymetric_sedimentation_mapsIf your community has a lake or pond, it may have crossed your mind that dredging will be needed at some point. Hopefully your community has had a professional reserve study performed which includes funds allocated to a future dredging project. If you have reviewed this line item, you may see that it is one of the most costly projects that a community will ever undergo. Still, you may find that even though funds have been allocated, these funds may not be adequate to cover the scope of work needed. In order to prepare for the “big dig” that may be around the corner, here are a couple of tips to prolong the time needed between dredging projects:

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Topics: Aeration, Lake Mapping and Bathymetry, Biological Augmentation

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