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Nuisance Aquatic Plant Highlight: Fanwort

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Oct 23, 2017


Written by Industry Expert Brea Arvidson, Aquatic Biologist

FanwortWhat’s purple and green, with a little white flower? Fanwort: it’s a competitive aquatic plant that grows in dense mat-forming patches. Its submersed leaves are its name-sake — dissected into a thin, flat fan-shaped display. The submersed leaves grow approximately 5 cm across and appear in opposite pairings on the stem. Small, diamond-shaped floating leaves are sometimes present at maturity, growing up to 3 cm long, but only 4 mm wide. The 3-petaled flower is inconspicuous and typically blossoms right at the water’s surface.

To date, fanwort occurs in 28 U.S. states, of which 12 

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Topics: Aquatic Weeds and Algae, Invasive Species

Should I be concerned with genetics when stocking Largemouth Bass?

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Oct 17, 2017

Written by Industry Expert Dr. Vic DiCenzo, Fisheries Biologist

Largemouth BassFish stocking is one of the most common management practices employed by fisheries managers to help enhance recreational fishing. There are a variety of reasons why managers stock fish:

• Establish populations in new or reclaimed lakes and ponds

• Supplement a population that experiences poor reproductive success

• Create a “put-and-take” fishery (such as trout or channel catfish)

• Introduce an alternative species

• Introduce genetic diversity

• Control predator populations

• Enhance the forage base

• Control undesirable species with a biological solution

Given the myriad of reasons why managers stock fish, a number of decisions must be made prior to stocking. 

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Topics: Fisheries Management, Pond Management Best Practices

Combating Invasive Species While Protecting Native Plants Downstream

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Oct 12, 2017

Written by Industry Expert Amanda Mahaney, Aquatic Biologist

FanwortAgawam Mill Pond, located in Wareham, Massachusetts, is a 150-acre waterbody owned by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and is managed by the MA Division of Fish and Wildlife (MA DFG). It is used heavily for recreational activities, such as boating, fishing and swimming, and supports moderate residential development. The pond has an average depth of six to eight feet with a maximum depth of twelve feet; therefore, emergent and submerged aquatic vegetation has the capability to flourish, rapidly expanding into dense colonies. Currently, the invasive, non-indigenous submersed vegetation (fanwort and variable watermilfoil) has inundated the pond causing a decline in water quality and has severely limited recreational activities for residents and guests.

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Topics: Aquatic Weeds and Algae, Invasive Species

Erosion & Beneficial Buffers: Like Sands Through the Hourglass

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Oct 10, 2017

Written by Industry Expert Gavin Ferris, Ecologist

Pond ErosionIt is often remarked upon how adept beavers are at creating their own aquatic habitat, but in my observation muskrats are nearly their equal in this regard. While beavers endeavor to turn every stream into a pond and every pond into a lake, muskrats seem intent on turning every pond into a marsh. Every muskrat burrow dug into the side of the bank collapses and erodes, washing sediment into the waterbody. The rodents continue stealing land from the shoreline as they dig new burrows into what was previously terra firma and the lake or pond continues to fill with what used to be its own banks.

This is but one example of shoreline erosion, which is (or at least should be) a concern of anyone with

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Topics: Pond Management Best Practices, Buffer Management

Cost-effective Solutions to Prolong the Lifespan of a Stormwater Pond

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Oct 03, 2017

AS SEEN IN Association Help Now PA/NJ: Written by Industry Expert Kyle Finerfrock, Environmental Scientist

Prolong DredgingWhen communities begin anticipating and planning for possible future expenses, they will likely discover that the removal of accumulated sediment in stormwater management facilites has a very large price tag. In fact, dredging is often one of the largest expenses a community will ever face. Luckily, there are things that can be done to help reduce costs and prolong the time span between dredging. By better understanding the purpose of a stormwater management facility and employing proper stormwater management techniques, a community can rest assured that the best decisions are made for the pond, the surrounding environment and the community’s budget.

While a stormwater management facility can be a beautiful asset to a community, it also has specific engineered and environmental purposes. First, it is used to slow down and dissipate the energy of the flowing water from rainstorms, which picks up speed and energy as it passes over a community’s impervious surfaces such as roofs, streets, driveways and sidewalks. If the water doesn’t get slowed down by a stormwater pond, it can

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Topics: Lake Mapping and Bathymetry, Published Articles

Ponder These Thoughts - Fall Pond Management Tips

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Sep 28, 2017

 
Floating FountainSOLitude Lake Management wants you to be prepared for the Autumn season and all of the wonderful cool weather it brings. With this in mind, we recommend you consider the following tips as you enjoy the colorful fall months on your lake or pond:

• Fall is a good time to think about repairing and maintaining the areas around your lake or pond. Be sure to trim the buffer zone and make certain that it is free of woody vegetation. Repair any eroded areas around your waterbody before they become major issues. Erosion repair can easily be done in the fall months when you can plant and seed the areas to allow for soil stabilization.

• Schedule a bathymetric study as well as a structural inspection of your lake or pond. This will allow for proper budgeting for 

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Topics: Seasonal Pond Tips

The Nuts and Bolts—and Bubbles—of Lake and Pond Aeration

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Sep 26, 2017

AS SEEN IN CAI ROCKY MOUNTAIN: Written by Industry Expert Shannon Junior, Aquatic Ecologist and Senior Business Development Consultant

CAI Rocky MountainThere are few events that can occur in a community pond that cause the amount of anxiety and uproar among the residents as a fish kill. Sure, we get plenty of calls about lake and pond algae blooms and clogged fountains and excessive trash, but nothing creates the level of panic that ensues when there are dead fish floating on the surface of the water. Many residents become concerned that there may have been a toxic spill or illegal dumping incident, or they think that the landscaping company must have used something on the surrounding property that killed the fish. In reality though, most fish kills occur not because of a poisonous substance, but because of low dissolved oxygen conditions in the water.

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Topics: Aquatic Weeds and Algae, Aeration

Patience Is Key: Raising Trophy Largemouth Bass

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Sep 21, 2017

Written by Industry Expert Aaron Cushing, Fisheries & Wildlife Biologist

Largemouth BassWith so much instant gratification in life these days, it is becoming harder and harder for people to exercise patience. When it comes to fisheries management, however, patience often leads to great future rewards.

A pond owner in North Carolina decided to take the patient approach to establishing a trophy Largemouth Bass fishery in his 9.1-acre pond. The pond was reset by the owner in 2011 and stocked with a variety of forage fish such as fingerling Bluegill, Redear Sunfish and Golden Shiner, as well as two-inch Largemouth Bass. In the spring of 2013, the pond owner decided to reach out for professional guidance to better gauge if his fishery was on the right track. That spring, SOLitude electrofished the pond for the first time, collected water quality data, and designed a Fisheries Management Plan to help the pond owner meet his long-term goals.

Electrofishing is a sampling technique conducted by fisheries biologists. Using a specialized boat that produces an electrical field, professionals can temporarily stun and collect fish to gather population data and remove undesired species. SOLitude’s initial electrofishing sample reflected the narrow size-class structure of mostly 12-15-inch Largemouth Bass from their stocking two years prior, with an average Relative Weight (Wr) of 90. Unfortunately, not all of the Black Crappie were eliminated during the owner's reset and their population remained well established. Additionally, the sunfish population of Bluegill and Pumpkinseed was comprised of mostly three- to five-inch fish, and based on the goals for the pond, the overall forage base was poor. There were plenty of tree stumps, but dense fish cover and spawning areas were also lacking, and water test results revealed very low alkalinity.

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Topics: Fisheries Management, Fisheries Projects

Assess Fish Habitat to Maximize Better Bass Fishing

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Sep 14, 2017

AS SEEN IN Angler Magazine: Written by Industry Expert Steven King, Field Manager

Bass Habitat.jpgWhen it comes to bass fishing, any experienced angler would agree that targeting the correct structure is essential to catching fish on a consistent basis. Throughout the year, changing weather patterns and seasons can trigger the natural instincts of various bass species to behave differently and seek different types of cover. While this can make day-to-day bass fishing more challenging, improving your knowledge about fish habitat and tendencies can help improve catch rates.

To anglers, the word “structure” is a very broad term that can be broken down into two main categories:

1) Natural fish cover (trees, brush, rocks, aquatic vegetation and natural contours of the waterbody)

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Topics: Fisheries Management, Pond Management Best Practices

SOLitude Professionals Receive 45th “Seeing Is Believing” Award

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Sep 12, 2017

SePRO AwardMultiple aquatics industry professionals from SOLitude Lake Management, an industry leader in lake, pond and wetland management, fisheries management and related environmental services for the United States, were recently awarded for their accomplishments in the sustainable management of public and private aquatic resources. SePRO Corporation, a developer and manufacturer of high quality, environmentally responsible solutions for aquatic plant management announced the news during their annual conference in August.

Five SOLitude team members received SePRO’s “Seeing Is Believing” award, which recognizes the highest standard of excellence in water quality management for lakes, ponds, stormwater retention ponds or other waterbodies that have demonstrated the effectiveness of SePRO products. Award submissions consisted of a case study documenting a technical program for nuisance aquatic weed and algae control, a detailed treatment summary for the waterbody, project results, before and after photos, and client satisfaction reports.

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Topics: SOLitude News, Aquatic Products

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