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Did You Know? Professional Answers to Common Lake & Pond Questions

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Nov 14, 2017

Watermeal

AS SEEN IN CAI New England: Written by Industry Expert Kara Sliwoski, Aquatic Biologist 

Despite the beauty, recreational space and natural wildlife habitats that our nearby waterbodies provide, lakes and ponds are often plagued by various ailments that can detract from the aesthetics, health, and functionality of their aquatic ecosystems. The following are a few responses to common questions often asked by those interested in lake and pond management.

Why is our pond green?
Without proper water quality testing and analysis, it can be difficult to determine the exact causes behind a green pond. The green you’re seeing may be algae. While algae look similar to some aquatic plants,

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Topics: Aquatic Weeds and Algae, Pond Management Best Practices

SOLitude Accepts Fifth Roaring 20 Award

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Nov 09, 2017

Roaring 20

SOLitude Lake Management was recently recognized for the fifth year in a row for implementing a successful business growth model. 

SOLitude was named to Inside Business' Roaring 20 list, which tabulates the twenty fastest-growing companies in Southeastern Virginia based on revenue and employee growth. An awards ceremony hosted at The Westin Town Center recognized 2017 Roaring 20 winners for the significant contributions they make to the local economy.

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Topics: SOLitude News

SOLitude Names Ryan Young as Volunteer of The Quarter

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Nov 06, 2017

Hurricane Harvey-041645-edited.jpg

Through our corporate volunteering and community outreach program, SOLitude has named Aquatic Technician Ryan Young as the Volunteer of the Quarter for the third quarter of 2017. In the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey, Ryan and his parents took action, spending more than 20 hours over Labor Day weekend transporting stranded neighbors through flooded streets with his family’s boat and retrieving belongings and pets from waterlogged homes. Ryan is now fostering a cat until the owner’s living situation improves.

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Topics: SOLitude News, The SOLution

What Largemouth Bass Should I Stock?

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Oct 30, 2017

AS SEEN IN Pond Boss MagazineWritten by Industry Expert Dave Beasley, Fisheries Biologist & Director of Fisheries 

Pond BossChasing the dream of growing trophy caliber Largemouth Bass is becoming more common throughout America. Although managing for trophy bass is an acquired skill that takes years of practice (and patience), we live in a time where pond owners can learn, via a variety of sources, enough to figure out a reasonable plan for success. As many have come to realize, managing for trophy bass can seem as much art as a science. There are multiple paths a pond owner can take to achieve a trophy fishery, none of which is guaranteed to work. Although you can implement various processes and still find success, some strategies are better than others. 

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Topics: Fisheries Management, Published Articles

Help SOLitude Bring Holiday Cheer to Families in Need

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Oct 25, 2017

HOLiday Cheer_c.jpgWith Thanksgiving right around the corner and the holiday season a couple short months away, SOLitude is gearing up for another year of community outreach.

This holiday season, SOLitude will provide Thanksgiving turkeys to school children and their families in our local communities as part of the Little Gobblers program. Through SOLitude’s annual HOLiday Cheer program, we are also seeking nominations from our clients, vendors and industry peers to help families who have fallen on hard times this season.

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Topics: SOLitude News, The SOLution

Nuisance Aquatic Plant Highlight: Fanwort

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Oct 23, 2017

Written by Industry Expert Brea Arvidson, Aquatic Biologist

FanwortWhat’s purple and green, with a little white flower? Fanwort: it’s a competitive aquatic plant that grows in dense mat-forming patches. Its submersed leaves are its name-sake — dissected into a thin, flat fan-shaped display. The submersed leaves grow approximately 5 cm across and appear in opposite pairings on the stem. Small, diamond-shaped floating leaves are sometimes present at maturity, growing up to 3 cm long, but only 4 mm wide. The 3-petaled flower is inconspicuous and typically blossoms right at the water’s surface.

To date, fanwort occurs in 28 U.S. states, of which 12 

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Topics: Aquatic Weeds and Algae, Invasive Species

Should I be concerned with genetics when stocking Largemouth Bass?

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Oct 17, 2017

Written by Industry Expert Dr. Vic DiCenzo, Fisheries Biologist

Largemouth BassFish stocking is one of the most common management practices employed by fisheries managers to help enhance recreational fishing. There are a variety of reasons why managers stock fish:

• Establish populations in new or reclaimed lakes and ponds

• Supplement a population that experiences poor reproductive success

• Create a “put-and-take” fishery (such as trout or channel catfish)

• Introduce an alternative species

• Introduce genetic diversity

• Control predator populations

• Enhance the forage base

• Control undesirable species with a biological solution

Given the myriad of reasons why managers stock fish, a number of decisions must be made prior to stocking. 

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Topics: Fisheries Management, Pond Management Best Practices

Combating Invasive Species While Protecting Native Plants Downstream

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Oct 12, 2017

Written by Industry Expert Amanda Mahaney, Aquatic Biologist

FanwortAgawam Mill Pond, located in Wareham, Massachusetts, is a 150-acre waterbody owned by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and is managed by the MA Division of Fish and Wildlife (MA DFG). It is used heavily for recreational activities, such as boating, fishing and swimming, and supports moderate residential development. The pond has an average depth of six to eight feet with a maximum depth of twelve feet; therefore, emergent and submerged aquatic vegetation has the capability to flourish, rapidly expanding into dense colonies. Currently, the invasive, non-indigenous submersed vegetation (fanwort and variable watermilfoil) has inundated the pond causing a decline in water quality and has severely limited recreational activities for residents and guests.

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Topics: Aquatic Weeds and Algae, Invasive Species

Erosion & Beneficial Buffers: Like Sands Through the Hourglass

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Oct 10, 2017

Written by Industry Expert Gavin Ferris, Ecologist

Pond ErosionIt is often remarked upon how adept beavers are at creating their own aquatic habitat, but in my observation muskrats are nearly their equal in this regard. While beavers endeavor to turn every stream into a pond and every pond into a lake, muskrats seem intent on turning every pond into a marsh. Every muskrat burrow dug into the side of the bank collapses and erodes, washing sediment into the waterbody. The rodents continue stealing land from the shoreline as they dig new burrows into what was previously terra firma and the lake or pond continues to fill with what used to be its own banks.

This is but one example of shoreline erosion, which is (or at least should be) a concern of anyone with

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Topics: Pond Management Best Practices, Buffer Management

Cost-effective Solutions to Prolong the Lifespan of a Stormwater Pond

by: SOLitude Lake Management   |   Oct 03, 2017

AS SEEN IN Association Help Now PA/NJ: Written by Industry Expert Kyle Finerfrock, Environmental Scientist

Prolong DredgingWhen communities begin anticipating and planning for possible future expenses, they will likely discover that the removal of accumulated sediment in stormwater management facilites has a very large price tag. In fact, dredging is often one of the largest expenses a community will ever face. Luckily, there are things that can be done to help reduce costs and prolong the time span between dredging. By better understanding the purpose of a stormwater management facility and employing proper stormwater management techniques, a community can rest assured that the best decisions are made for the pond, the surrounding environment and the community’s budget.

While a stormwater management facility can be a beautiful asset to a community, it also has specific engineered and environmental purposes. First, it is used to slow down and dissipate the energy of the flowing water from rainstorms, which picks up speed and energy as it passes over a community’s impervious surfaces such as roofs, streets, driveways and sidewalks. If the water doesn’t get slowed down by a stormwater pond, it can

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Topics: Lake Mapping and Bathymetry, Published Articles

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